Asia Pacific Regional Internet Conference on Operational Technologies

 

What is APRICOT?

Throughout Asia Pacific Region, Internet service providers, backbone and regional networks, web hosting facilities, firewalls, and Intranets are being created, deployed, and installed at a staggering pace. The technicians, managers, entrepeneurs and decision-makers responsible are under tremendous pressure to master the skills necessary to build and operate these increasingly complex systems.

The mission of the Asia Pacific Regional Internet Conference on Operational Technologies (APRICOT) is to provide a forum for those key Internet builders in the region to learn from their peers and other leaders in the Internet community from around the world.

Held annually, the ten day long summit consists of seminars, workshops, tutorials, conference sessions, birds-of-a-feather (BOFs), and other forums all with the goal of spreading and sharing the knowledge required to operate the Internet within the Asia Pacific region.

In an attempt to ease the travel burden on attendees, APRICOT is held in conjunction with one of the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre's (APNIC) two annual meetings, and meetings of other Asia Pacific Internet organisations.

  • APRICOT's mission is to develop and advance the skills and understanding necessary to grow a robust Internet infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific region. APRICOT is about bringing the world's top Internet experts together with those who can most benefit from their knowledge.
  • APRICOT attendees are the key builders of Asia's Internet. Many of the world's best Internet engineers attend APRICOT either to teach, present or do their own human networking.
  • APRICOT provides its sponsors the chance to participate in a quality, content-rich event with excellent opportunities to target their products and services at the decision-makers in the Asia Pacific Internet community.
  • APRICOT's primary goal is to provide a vehicle for the transfer of technology and techniques to the Asia Pacific Region. As such, our attendance fees are set well below those of the more promotionally orientated conferences.
  • APRICOT is an activity supported by various Asia Pacific Internet organisations as well as numerous individuals who give freely of their time and talent, and is not a commercial profit making venture. Any surplus funds are used to support outreach activities in the less developed areas of the Asia Pacific region.

How APRICOT began

David Conrad, at the time the Director General of APNIC, saw the early NANOGs taking place with great success in the US. NANOG was aimed at the North American ISP market, with the rest of the world having no equivalent. David suggested the Asia & Pacific region should have its own Internet technical operations conference. Barry Greene, then working for SingTel, convinced SingTel to support the event, and Harish Pillay persuaded the Singapore Computer Society to sponsor it at the RELC Centre in Singapore.

With venue, Internet connectivity, and sponsorship assured, a team of volunteers constructed the terminal room, and Digital paid for the catering, the first ever APRICOT took place in January 1996. The first APRICOT social event was a visit to the Singapore Night Safari.

APRICOT and APIA

In September 2002, the APRICOT Executive Committee and the APIA Board agreed that APIA and APRICOT should work more closely together. And as from March 2003, APIA became the legal entity supporting the APRICOT conference effort. APRICOT is now APIA's main activity, with the Board working to ensure the future development and growth of APRICOT.

The revised organisation has the APIA Board responsible for the legal entity which supports APRICOT. The APRICOT Management Committee takes on the day to day role of working with the local host on the APRICOT conference organisation, with the APRICOT Programme Committee building the technical programme.

By 2010 APRICOT had become the foremost Internet Summit in the Asia Pacific region, holding a conference seeing participation from around the world, and participation by many of the Asia Pacific region's Internet organisations. It also has a strong fellowship programme ensuring that participants from the least developed nations can participate in the summit.

In 2014 APIA and APNIC agreed to coordinate the location of their respective conferences so that each of the Asia Pacific's four sub-regions gets an equal opportunity to host their respective events.